What HSE say

As an employer, you must manage any health and safety risks before people can work alone. This applies to anyone contracted to work for you, including self-employed people. Lone workers are those who work by themselves without close or direct supervision, for example:

  • as delivery drivers, health workers or engineers
  • as security staff or cleaners
  • in warehouses or petrol stations
  • at home

There will always be greater risks for lone workers without direct supervision or anyone to help them if things go wrong.

Under the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations, you must manage the risk to lone workers. Think about who will be involved and which hazards could harm those working alone.

You must:

  • train, supervise and monitor lone workers
  • keep in touch with them and respond to any incident

When a lone worker will be at someone else’s workplace you must ask that employer about any risks and control measures to make sure they are protected.

 

Risks to consider

Risks that particularly affect lone workers include:

  • violence in the workplace
  • stress and mental health or well being
  • a person’s medical suitability to work alone
  • the workplace itself, for example if it’s in a rural or isolated area

 

High-risk work

Certain high-risk work requires at least one other person. This includes work:

  • in a confined space, where a supervisor may need to be there, along with someone in a rescue role
  • near exposed live electricity conductors
  • in diving operations
  • in vehicles carrying explosives
  • with fumigation

 

Follow the link to find out about our Lone Worker Solution

Lone Worker